Skip to main content

About your Search

20120901
20120930
STATION
CNBC 16
FBC 16
CNN 9
CNNW 8
WBAL (NBC) 8
KNTV (NBC) 7
MSNBC 3
MSNBCW 3
LANGUAGE
English 80
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 80 (some duplicates have been removed)
in the united states and said to be insulting to islam. >>> u.s. drones join the manhunt for those who killed a u.s. diplomat and three other americans. concerns over the tep id response by the new regime in egypt. >> i don't think that we would consider them an ally, but we don't consider them an enemy. >> we're covering every angle of this developing story. first, let's take a step back and look at how things have unfolded over the past 48 hours. the outrage first ignited tuesday in egypt. protesters converged on the embassy. within hours, crowds gathered outside benghazi, libya. armed militants killed the u.s. ambassador and three of the staffers. today, crowds storm the u.s. embassy in yemen. riot police eventually turned them back with tear gas. also today, demonstrators turn out in iran. they aamass outside the swiss embassy, which represents u.s. interests in iran. let's get the latest now from that region. mohammed jamjoon join us. >> about 2,000 to 3,000 protesters that were marching toward the u.s. embassy, many of them aable to get close enough to the main gates. they started scali
it because he loved the work. he really thought the mission of the united states to help these fragile countries move ahead, start anew, that's what he really loved about libya. from the time that he was working to restore ties with the libyan government to being an envoy to the opposition and helping the rebels on the ground in bengzi, to now becoming the u.s. ambassador to libya, he really was someone that felt it was really important to kind of -- the democratic values and need to build proper institutions and try and have a peaceful stable country. >> we understand that he was really regarded in some ways as a hero to the rebels and the people in benghazi in particular. how did he feel? how comfortable did he feel moving around in libya? >> he felt very comfortable. that's what a lot of people are talking about today that maybe he felt a little too comfortable. chris was someone that felt very at ease in benghazi. he knew the area well. he knew the country well. so he might have not -- he might have felt a little bit more immune than some other people would to his safety because he
for the united states coming on and misleading the public. basically we have sent a letter to ambassador rice to explain herself. >> you know, there's a story out today, i didn't know if you saw it, senator, but the story essentially was that the united states government within 24 hours knew it was a pre-planned terrorist attack. your thought on that. because that indicts rice and whomever else was in this cover-up even more. >> that's right. ambassador rice came on the sunday morning programs and said that, in fact, it was a spontaneous reaction of course to the video. and in no way was an expression of hostility toward america. and you have to say killing four american heroes, quite honestly, attacking our consulate, if that's not hostility toward america, i don't know what it is. so, no, i think it's pretty apparent that the administration must have known, had information, and ambassador rice was sent out on the sunday programs to mislead the american public. i find that outrageous, and i think she needs to explain herself and explain herself fast. we should also call for an investigation.
is that the undocumented would then stay in the united states. so some people not liking this. >>> a single mother of 4 losing big time against the big-time record labels in the minneapolis "star tribune." an appeals court reinstating a jury's decision to level. listen to this, a $222,000 judgment against jamie thomas rassett. the court reduced damages to $54,000. the recording industry accused her of illegally downloading more than 1700 files. >>> all right, while you were sleeping a decision made thousands of miles away that will have a dramatic affect on the world economy and your stock portfolio. yeah, a court across the world that holds the global economy in its hands. the story coming up. [ female announcer ] caroline penry began using olay total effects in 2001. since then, there's been one wedding, 2 kids, and 43 bottles of olay total effects. so in spite of 185 tantrums 378 pre-dawn starts and a lot of birthdays, caroline still looks amazing. thanks to the trusted performance of olay you can challenge what's possible. 60 years, millions of women, real results. but proven technologies allow nat
on american aircraft over the united states. i don't think that's going -- nothing's going to stop that happening. >> reporter: the u.s. government is not even considering allowing passengers to use cell phones on planes. but officials are looking into whether passengers can use devices like these to read or listen to music during takeoff and landing. american airlines pilots just started using ipads in the cockpit throughout the flight to access maps and other information. flight attendants will also get tablets to use inside the cabin. and consumer advocates say allowing passengers to do the same during takeoff and landing would only be fair. >> it kind of bothers consumers and passengers not so much the fact that they can't make cell phone calls, just the fact they can't use any electronic devices. >> reporter: and he worries one day on domestic u.s. flights dealing with a loud neighbor talking on a mobile phone may be the next in-flight inconvenience. sandra endo, cnn, washington. >> polls show mitt romney's support is lagging in key states. we'll talk with newt gingrich about
with the united states. we are your number one exporter relation between colombia and the u.s. do you feel that the current administration is doing enough to encourage colombian trade? is there something more that can be done? what is your wish-list for your country related to the united states? >> but at least to have congress ratify the free-trade agreement with colombia, the free-trade agreement we negotiated and closed with the united states during the previous administration. liz: david has one more question. david, go ahead. david: it is related to the problems in mexico. as you know corruption is endemic in mexico. there is so much corruption that has gone on for so many decades in mexico. again a lot of businesses are reluctant to get in because of that. if you're going to clean up the drug problem in mexico as you did in colombia, you have to deal with corruption. particularly among the police who are supposed to go after the drug dealers, not work with the drug dealers. how do you deal with a corruption problem in a place like mexico? >> no, no. i can not speak about mexico. i ha
's a crude film. they know it has nothing to do with the united states government. it is an excuse. one intelligence person told me, if you scratch the surface, and if you gave every street vendor from street vendor to prime minister in that region a chance to throw a rock at the u.s. embassy, they would. so this is their excuse. >> look at what's happening in afghanistan 11 years later. >> and look what's happening in afghanistan. and is it just me? willie, is it just me, or is it -- we have the grave concern about the tragedy that happened to the ambassador and our people that have served so proudly for, you know, for the state department who were killed. and yet this weekend, more u.s. troops in afghanistan gunned down by our supposed allies. this happens every day. this happens every day. and yes, our u.s. ambassador being killed is just absolutely horrific. but every single day, young american men and women are gunned down in afghanistan. >> 51 of them this year on insider attacks. 51 nato troops including many americans this year. >> nobody's talking about it. >> to your point exa
time to talk. to your point the united states administration said we still think there is still an opportunity for diplomacy. what you heard from prime minister netanyahu today is that israel is not going to act unilaterally. they are, they feel they are in concert with the u.s. policy at this time. and that they feel that there is a need for the world. he spoke in global terms that the threat that it poses. it will spark an arms race to make the middle east totally tender box for terrorist. >> bret: judge? >> i thought the prime minister netanyahu made a brilliant and compelling, very, very scary case for containing iran. but i disagree with juan. he damned the president with the faint praise. it's obvious he doesn't want the president re-elected. obama has approval rating in the single digit in streets of tel aviv and jerusalem. i take a little different approach here. israel is a sovereign country. it doesn't need the approval of any international body to defend itself. if iranian use of nuclear weapons on israel is imminent under principles of the just war and international
international indebtedness. if the united states economy is not as strong as it has been in the past, we cannot protect our values around the globe, and we cannot negotiate with bankers. this gives us serious weaknesses on the economic and national-security front. the ultimate insult, we handed to the next generation that had no safe in the kinds of things we have seen go on and ask them to pick up the bill, and that seems like a gross injustice and mass. gerri: i want you to respond to something, david axelrod, the president's base of riser said about this and why the president is doing the right thing. here he is. >> the president's plan would do what the simpson bowles plan would do, cut the deficit by $4 trillion, reduce attack under our deficits down to 3 percent of the gross domestic product which is what everybody agrees we need to stabilize the debt. then we will be in a position to begin reducing it further. gerri: what do you make of that. >> perfect except for a couple of flaws. we have not seen the growth and are not likely to get the kind of growth that they assume in those budget
surveillance in the united states. after their two weeks of work, lawmakers will likely only finish government spending, maybe disaster aid or benefits for needy families. it is very unlikely congress resolves anything on taxes, fiscal cliff, post office reform, or the farm bill. and a top house republican blames it on the senate and says it is all democrats. >> the u.s. congress has been working quite a bit. it's the u.s. senate that's been stopping everything. so we don't know how much comes to fruition, but we do know we will get things through the house, but when it gets to the senate -- [inaudible]. rich: democrats say it is the republicans fault. in an op-ed in politico, it says since president obama took office republicans have done little but obstruct and delay. democrats have offered their plans. republicans theirs. neither sees the political benefit of negotiating any of this until they know who wins in november. connell: rich, thank you. rich edson in d.c. for more, let's bring douglas holtz-eakin in, former cbo director, also in washington. it's almost a joke to us after a while, t
. the defense minister pointed out we have best relations between israel and united states of the securities we have ever had. we have operation iron dome which allows the folks in israel to be protected from these rockets. i think it is one of those things that it is election year thing. connell: but the week of the u.n. general assembly, you don't think that's a fair political criticism from the other side? say hey listen, there's a lot going on here in the world, you should have sat down with them, you don't think that's fair? >> i don't think it's fair. he keeps good communications with the rest of the world. our relations with the rest of the world have been better than a long time. when i travel, people were very very pleased with what the administration was doing. they respect the president. look, we're in the last what 40 some days of a presidential campaign. that's the high priority. connell: let's talk about that a little bit before we let you go. the republicans would say look at the unemployment rate under president obama how it's stayed above 8%, this is quote unquote our year, we
the list of one of the wealthiest people in the united states for the 12 year. he has a net worth of $66 billion. while the head of berkshire hathaway came in second with a net worth of $46 billion. that's the latest from the fox business, giving you the power to prosper. melissa: so the fiscal cliff is quickly approaching. let's find out what congress is doing about it. rich edson joins us in d.c. with the latest. rich? >> we'll call them the cliff experts. federal reserve chairman ben bernanke, the director of the congressional budget office and the chief of staff on the joint committee on taxation. these are the authorities on capitol hill what lawmakers actions will do to the economy and the federal budget. they're meeting with members of the senate finance committee and others. fox business was there where budget committee chairman kent conrad said congress could work out a framework to solve the cliff before it hits. >> there might be an interim step in order to give time for the committees of jurisdiction to actually come up with some of the specifics. but that the overall agreeme
, perhaps even the first latino president of the united states. he knows full well why he was picked to give this speech. in his words he said, i'm young, and i'm hispanic. >> hey, everybody. i'm julian castro. >> reporter: first thing you need to know, it's pronounced julian castro. the j is silent. not julian. but even if you get the spanish wrong, don't worry. san antonio's mayor has never mastered spanish either. >> i understand it better than i speak it. i grew up in my household with my mother and grandmother mostly speaking english. i understand it, but speaking it back is always the challenge. >> reporter: julian castro's grandmother immigrated from mexico and worked in the chicano movement in san antonio. from the humble beginnings, julian and his twin brother went on to stanford university and harvard law school. now he is a rising star in the democratic party, tapped to give the keynote speech at the democratic convention, the same speech an unknown barack obama gave at the convention in 2004. >> you get talked about as someone who could be the first hispanic governor of texas. so
been going in terms of violence, and also, he says this is not over yet because if the united states does not respond appropriately to his mind, which means punishing those involved with this film, he says these protests could continue. i said, what do you want to have dope to the filmmakers? he said, well, i'd like to see them tried in front of a sharia court meaning if they don't repent for insulting the prophet, he thinks they should be executed. that shows how quickly, simply how a jihadist leader talks about an anti-american protest brings out a few thousand people in front of the u.s. embassy. that shows the ground swell of anti-americanism now taking place in cairo. back to you. tracy: leeland, out in cay row, thank you very much. ashley: continuing with rising tensions in the middle east, oil traders growing more concerned as conflicts spread west to oil rich nigeria. phil flynn has more on this. are you concerned then, phil, what's going on in nigeria? >> i am right now. see, egypt doesn't produce a lot of oil, and because we built in good buffer of supply in case of a disru
're asking is an important one. >> there's assumption the united states has military might to wipe out the nuclear programs. but there's -- there's an argument that israel's making, these things are hidden, underground. how do we know whether we would just be slowing them down and delaying the inevitable? >> well, i think we have to -- here again we have to wreck flies a certain fact. neither the united states nor israel can destroy the iranian capacity to build a nuclear weapon once and for all. we can destroy all of the facilities in the infrastructure that they have and it would be very costly and take them time to rebuild it, but they have the know-how and engineering capability to rebuild whatever would be destroyed. one of the reason it's important to create a context where the international community believes everything's been done that could be done and you've exhausted all of the diplomatic options and given the economic sanctions sufficient time, you need that so that the world says, you know what? the iranians had a chance to prevent the use of force against them, they didn'
's about 1.2 million people infected with hiv here in the united states, jim, and about 20% to 25% of those individuals are unaware that they're infected. and what's most concerning is it's those individuals who are infected but unaware. they're responsible for 50% to 70% of the forward transmission. so our objective is to put as many tools out there as we can to make it easier for people to know their hiv status. >> do you envision a world where someone has unprotected sex, they would go to the drugstore and get this within 72 hours? >> we have spent a lot of time making sure consumers can understand the appropriate use of this product. it's not designed to detect infection immediately after someone is infected. but it's exactly the same technology that's used in doctors offices, hospitals and the public health market. this is the rapid leading hiv test in the united states and now we're making it available to consumers. >> our show has been focused on hepatitis c as the biggest opportunity in medicine. you've got a test for it, but you just don't think -- you talk about it as a billion do
this morning. they'll just try to get a share of the touch screen market in the united states. to your point about cash going out, more smart phones being sold than expected it is still a big shortage so the move today, is that indicative of -- >> they're not going out of business. >> even though the core operations remain unprofitable. their cash build was 2.3 from 2.2 on the quarter. >> they had more cash than previously. >> and their shipments continue to go down. they bleed people. >> you have the developing countries now. >> the pricing pressure is greater. >> there's always ban thought someone would buy them. but people felt why buy them because they'll run out of money and when they run out of money you can get them for nothing and you get all that intellectual property for nothing. there's a lot of companies that wish they had that keyboard patent. maybe that is worth something. i'm just saying that, look. i want the blackberry 10 to ship earlier. i thought becky's interview was terrific. it's very difficult to be as negative as you might have been before knowing that the restructuri
the day that the president was on the phone with netanyahu who is in the united states instead of meeting him in person. a white house statement said they are in full agreement of a shared goal to prevent iran obtaining a nuclear weapon, it stopped short of agreal to the red line that he demanded thursday. >> where should a red line be drawn? right here. before, before iran completes a second stage of nuclear enrichment. >> romney pressured the president scheduling his own call today with netanyahu. >> the national security threat is iran with nuclear capability. we spoke about the assessment of where the red line ought to be drawn. >> romney took the opening to hamer a president who has seen drop on foreign policy. the problem is bigger on the questioning of the handling of libya with 39% of the public approving, 43% disapproving and 17% unsure. >> i'm supposed to be eye candy here. >> this week started with the president keeping an -- taping ed soap of "the view" instead of holding meetings with the world leaders in the u.n. >> top democrats today defended the president noting it's impo
that insulted the little darlings feelings. >> the leader defended the united states of america and said there will be consequences if you attack this country. >> weekly standard kol lull nift bill crystal wrote, romney is right to bring home the weakness of the obama administration, exemplified in the disgraceful statement issued yesterday. if romney can prove strong and thoughtful over foreign policy it could be an infliction point in the presidential campaign. richard wolffe, i don't doubt this an inflection point we led into the show with mitt romney talking about making america stronger and again beating this drum of conflict overseas. one point he said there's only one conflict allotted in the president's defense plan as if americans have some sort of blood lust for going into various countries around the world and engaging militarily. do you think the gop can turn this around for mitt romney? >> no. there are a couple of problems, major problems, that mitt romney has underscored with his performance over the last 24 hours. one is that, as a challenger, especially against an incumb
day now. let's take the three big bad/good battlegrounds. china, europe, and the united states. look, we know that china used to be one of the world's great growth engines. it almost singlehandedly kept the global economy afloat during the global recession as the chinese communists figured out how to spur domestic spending. but after playing the role of the world's economic engine for so long, the chinese locomotive seems to be in danger of running off the rails. each piece of data is weaker than the last. so what's good about that? well, much of the slowdown in china seems somewhat self-inflicted. when the pure si realized it overstimulated the economy, governments hit the brakes and in many ways still seems like it's happening. the hope is that the chinese will stop stepping on the brake pedal but start cutting rates, adding real ago taken to the downshift in their economy. how about europe? the european central bank meeting this week and we're expecting to hear some chatter in unison that's going to reverse the declining economies over there and maybe unite to save the spanish ban
, ceo and cofounder. we always love when people come back to the united states. so far you have just begun the process. talk about you do and why you chose china as a place to do it. you do led lighting. how long were you in china and why did you choose to go there originally? >> well, first of all, thanks for having me, dave, liz. we chose to go to china, we first opened in 2007 in china. we did a lot of engineering stuff over there because the costs were obviously a lot cheaper. and really what we concentrated on in 2000 was expanding there quite a bit. since, since 2009 we've really, we've really looked at our costs and even though it is a lot cheaper for to us manufacture products in china we've done the proper social thing about bringing businesses back to the u.s.. david: so tell us, first of all exactly how much of a loss, i mean, essentially you are going to be paying more by higher labor costs, will you not, coming into the united states? >> yeah, we're paying more but you know, there is field expenses too have that gone up which makes china knot appealing to us and also the
competitors to step up the game in order for mcdonald's to start missing here in the united states. what will mcdonald's force to be done? and will that be good from an investor standpoint? how much will they have to give up maybe in terms of margins in order to get those customers back, for instance? >> you know, i think it's a combination of being more aggressive on the dollar menu. they will give a little bit on the margin side and we have near term caution on that particular point. but i also think they have a pretty nice product pipeline shaping up for 2013, which gives us excitement, and it's one of the reasons why mcdonald's is one of our favorite medium term names in the space. we do have some caution based on more difficult comparisons that show up in the fourth quarter as well as the threat of higher food costs that are going to pay out early next year. >> we should point out that with 104th on the price target. jim, we hear again from r.j. about food costs. actually the flip side of this is that we have a very weak labor market in the united states. so for as long as we're not
the united states does not talk about trickle-up economics, take that 80%, educate them, make them pay taxes, and stop charging the top 5% more and more for what they create. why is that conversation not happening here? >> well, that's part of why inet, the institute for new economic thinking, was founded. james heckman at university of chicago and nobel prize-winning economist and i are working on a major program. we have 179 people worldwide on early-age human capital, early-age education which includes public health. >> you just have to put more resources into the education system to make it work. >> and better allocation of incentives, absolutely right. you're talking about a national tragedy. >> the word "resources" is loaded especially this week when we've got chicago teachers facing a potential injunction. >> yes. >> overturning citizens united, right, is not going to -- is not going to pacify what's happening outside. >> mm-hmm. >> neither is paying teachers more or giving them a shorter school year. right? >> i think if you paid teachers more, say relative to other professions, you
of the greatest nation on earth. thank you. god bless you. and god bless these united states. >> the president wrapping up his acceptance speech for the nomination for president of the united states. democratic party. in charlotte, north carolina. can be described, perhaps, as a more subdued speech than the one that he gave at his initial convention four years ago. still touching on topics that are very popular. among his base. you had the tax issue, you had the issues of education. there were references to the automobile bailout. but still, john harwood who's with us, and larry kudlow still with us, and we have more guests coming in in a moment. there were parts that were surprising at times. opening up more land for natural gas drilling. we talk about tax reform. we talk about defense and strong on foreign policy. larry kudlow, did you feel this was a more centrist speech than you expected? >> no, not particularly. i mean, he said he was looking at the principles of bowles/simpson and simpson/bowles that those principles included pro growth tax reform across the board, getting rid of the ded
30 times before it runs out of room to ignite that economy. unlike europe and the united states, the policy makers in china have plenty of room to maneuver, and that fact seems to be endlessly forgotten by the bears who point this out daily. sure, many of their banks are bankrupt. i'm not saying that i don't trust -- hey, they built a ton of bridges and tunnels to nowhere, but never underestimate the problem-solving power of cash on the balance sheet. and china's got cash up the yazoo if not the yangtze for good measure. then there is the united states. here we have the fiscal cliff. the fiscal cliff is something we have moderate control over because it's a question of political will. it can be resolved. anything that can be resolved will be dealt with in some fashion. and i think that's why the stock market has been climbing despite the obvious chasm ahead of us. sure, there are other reasons that could cause the selloff stocks. stocks have had a big run. valuations getting stretched if we have little growth ahead of us. twice in the last month federal express, man, they disapp
, state fair and there's also the brewery which is the only -- brewery in the united states. a beautiful setting as well. you can taste your beer and see all the leaves turning there as well. >> really great. why don't we go to the blue ridge mountains in asheville, north carolina. >> that is a beautiful spot. >> i love it there, it's gloriously beautiful. >> gloriously beautiful indeed and one of the destinations you get to see all the color spectrum in fall. every possible color imaginable two big highlights, the blue ridge parkway, which is one of america's favorite drives, you can bike that or drive it get off and go hike and climbing you built mother biltmore estate largest private residence in the united states, built for george vanderbi vanderbilt, has an amazing art collection and formal garden. >> look at that. that shot is gorgeous. >> gorgeous. >> colorado. >> oh, come on. >> just hearing the word. >> oh. rocky mountain high. >> indeed. lots of yellows. >> tell us about that area. >> the grand mesa national forest was a big pick for us. you can go up a chair lift there and see
sales net revenue saving up to $4.5 billion in taxes on goods sold in the united states. we talked to microsoft. here's what they told us. they say, microsoft has a complex business and we must comply with the complicated tax code of the united states, resulting in an exceedingly complex tax structure. second company in the crosshairs here today is going to be hewlett-packa hewlett-packard. the senate committee saying since at least 2008, hp has used billions of dollars of intercompany offshore loans to effectively repatriate untaxed foreign profits back to the united states to run u.s. operations. that's contrary to the intent of u.s. tax policy. we talked to hewlett-packard. here's what they told us. they say, hp has complied fully with all applicable provisions of the u.s. internal revenue code and auditor ernst and young has audited. we'll learn more about what this is up committee found in about a half-hour. >>> the committee on banking, housing and urban affairs, subcommittee on securities, insurance and investment is holding a hearing on high-frequency trading and they are t
how the united states is responding next. first as we do every day at this time of day, check out how oil is moving right now based on that news out of libya. not moving much at all. down 11 cents. $97.11 a barrel. before copd... i took my son fishing every year. we had a great spot, not easy to find, but worth it. but with copd making it hard to breathe, i thought those days might be over. so my doctor prescribed symbicort. it helps significantly improve my lung function starting within five minutes. symbicort doesn't replace a rescue inhaler for sudden symptoms. with symbicort, today i'm breathing better. and that means...fish on! symbicort is for copd including chronic bnchitis and emphysema. it should not be taken more than twice a day. symbirt may increase your risk of lung infections, osteoporosis, d some eye problems. tell your doctor if you have a heart condition or high blood pressure before taking it. with copd, i thought i'd miss our family tradition. now symbicort significantly improves my lung function, starting within 5 minutes. and that makes a difference in my breathin
: all electric. i can understand the resistance in the united states. if we're talking about other countries, fair enough. and that's been its niche market. charles: it is a niche market but big enough market for an individual company like tesla where if you are trying to ram them down everybody's throats ala the volt. i think anybody who buys the roadster isn't going to be worried about the distance on the charge, the cost. when you have 100 grand to blow on a car, those are things that you aren't really --. i think the stock goes to 38. cheryl: thank you very much, charles. we will see you next hour. it is quarter past the hour right now. stocks now and every 15 minutes. nicole: this stock is doing really well today, take a look at the shares are faring right now. tivo has come to an agreement with verizon. it said that verizon actually agreed to pay over 250 million dollars to settle pending patent litigation over video services. considered great news for tivo, up about 5% today. let's take a look at major market averages right now. the dow jones industrial average down 25 point
countries like the united states are already past the 50% penetration market. you got the smart phone. the incremental advantage of a new one, you know, is much less than the advantage for the future phone to a smart phone. >> people always trade up. you don't have total saturation. if you have one, you expect to get the new model, you drop it, you break it, it's note like you're not going to get another one. the expectations, the growth is exploding. 50 million iphones sold in the december quarter; right? that's the base bar. you know, that's the expectation. apple needs to beat that hurdle to keep forward momentum. when you only sold 150 million total units in the june quarter alone, worldwide among all the vendors, a third of the marketplace, is it poll? of course it is, but can they make them fast enough? that's the issue. >> is there backlash setting in for apple? i was watching tv in the samsung galaxy commercial makes fun of the people waiting in line for the iphone5. everywhere you go, you see the galaxy posters, point your phone up, and you get five free songs. there's fierce
about the united states and how that relates to what israel does against iran and what we do again to stop iran from developing nuclear weapons? >> it is a really interesting statement from netanyahu. hillary clinton came out yesterday and said no deadlines. i think the israelis want a firm deadline from the united states on when we will do military action because ultimately if you look at this operation, yes, the israelis can hit something, yes, they can do some damage, but only with the united states, only with our b-1 bombers and cruise missiles can you do significant long-term damage to the nuclear facilities in iran. so the question is, yes, the israelis could go alone, but it is always far more optimal to get on board with the united states. so i think this issue is going to remain a live issue into 2013, because i don't see how we have an off ramp. dagen: right. helima terrific to see you. we covered so much in little time. next time more time i promise. >> thanks. connell: new book that's come out from bob woodward. we will talk about that book on the day in which boehner h
the threat of terrorism, globally and here in the united states. the third, i think about my children a lot. what their future is like. >> a small business owner says the federal regulations made it difficult to add employees. >> if we hire the additional people we have to hire an outside firm to main tain and make sure we stay in regulation or we have to hire individuals a bring them on board to do that. >> an undecided voter says she is leaning toward one candidate for the economy and the other on social issues. >> i struggle whether i should decide on the pocketbook or the social issues. the two parties are very, very different. >> experts predict the obama and the romney campaigns will continue a significant push in virginia. to win over the undecided. >> virginia is one of the closest of the tossup states. it's nearly tied if you ample out the polls. as a consequence, the two or three or 4% hard undecided could easily make the difference. a number of undecided voters are sick of the campaign ads and tired of the robo calls asking for their votes. but with 13 electoral votes at issue he
to registering outside the united states. >> are there some fees and taxation considerations that go into that? certainly. we pay a wide array of fees, duties, and we pay all of the taxes that we are required to pay. >> of all commercial cruise ships, only one, norwegian's pride of america, is registered in the united states. carnival ships are registered in several countries. the costa cruise line for instance flies an italian flag and pays italian taxes accordingly, a rate of 30%. senator rockefeller says the industry is piloting their boats through legal loopholes. >> they don't reimburse coast guard. they don't pay taxes, which would help these 20 federal agencies which are watching over them. they always say safety is their emphasis. i've never quite believed that. i think the bottom line is their emphasis. >> finances aside, the question looming after the concordia disaster, is the cruise line taking safety seriously? >> did it take the deaths of 32 people onboard to prompt you to take action? when you have diabetes... your doctor will say get smart about your weight. that's why there's
. but here in the united states, with respect to the rally, i'm getting a large number of questions. we're getting a large number of questions about whether or not the stimulus boost from federal reserve easing is what it used to be, so to speak. i would remind people take a look at the last couple of instances, we've had similar measures. we've had similar instances of people wondering whether the fed was -- if i had $1 for every time we talked about the fed being out of bullets, i'd have lots of dollars. and we're going through that again. >> they would all be worth less. >> the previous dollar, yes. >> less than maybe ten years ago. not necessarily less than five years ago. >> shame on you for that populist comment there that you should be cutting taxes in europe. at what point do you think the spanish are going to cut taxes given the situation that they're in? shame on you for appealing to your republican base in such a shameless way. >> btig's clients would be interested to know that i had a republican base, but listen. at the end of the day, there isn't a sort of a one-size-fits-a
aren't moving anywhere. it's on hope they can get it rationalized. united states is on fire and everyone keeps saying why can't we buy ford. because of latin america and europe. >> facebook, a bit backward looking, but the best day yesterday since that ipo. it's almost you can't say ipo without saying botched ipo. that's the way everybody says it. was there a turn yesterday? >> i think that you're going to have a well p like situation is what people hope. yelp was a giant lock up that expired and all the shorts were piled on. it went up seven. you have to bet that everyone is overly short facebook to get this thing going. i think it's more of the dynamics of the lock up in actual earnings. >> the big lock up is coming november and by november, we'll have more than a million shares hit the market. >> that's a big lock up to overcome. >> aig was remarkable. had 600 million shares hit, but aig of course was valued at half book. facebook, not valued at half book. >> taking a look at the financials, it is worth noting because xlf closed at five-month highs. taking a bit of a brea
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 80 (some duplicates have been removed)